Citizenship Rutgers

THANK YOU, VOLUNTEERS! (NB)

May 4, 2012 - no comments. Posted by in Citizenship Rutgers.

Thank You Poster

Thank you Citizenship Rutgers volunteers!

On Sunday, December 9th, you made it possible for Citizenship Rutgers to provide naturalization application assistance to roughly 60 Legal Permanent Residents. “Americans by choice” who attended represented 25 distinct countries including Argentina, Australia, Canada, Chile, China, Costa Rica, Cuba, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Egypt, El Salvador, Guatemala, Haiti, India, Italy, Jamaica, Liberia, Mexico, Paraguay, Peru, Philippines, Sierra Leone, South Korea, Spain, and Venezuela.

As committed volunteers, you welcomed participants to Rutgers and helped them navigate the path to US citizenship. For many, it was their first visit to Rutgers and a day many of them will never forget. Thank you!
A few requests:

  • Tell your friends and family about the project. We’re always on the lookout for new partners, volunteers and funders. These could be individuals, companies or organizations. Send your ideas to CR@eagleton.rutgers.edu.
  • Please take a few minutes to tell us about your Citizenship Rutgers experience. Your feedback will help us know what’s working well and what might be improved.
  • Come back! We look forward to working with you again. Citizenship Rutgers will hold assistance drives on Sunday, March 10 in New Brunswick, Saturday, March 30 in Camden, and Saturday, April 6 in Newark.
  • Find fresh photos and leave comments about the day on CR’s Facebook page.

Once again, thank you for giving generously of your time, your talent and your passion!

With gratitude,

The Citizenship Rutgers Team

THANK YOU, VOLUNTEERS! (Camden)

April 26, 2012 - no comments. Posted by in Citizenship Rutgers.

Thank You Poster

Thank you Citizenship Rutgers volunteers!

On Saturday afternoon, you made it possible for Citizenship Rutgers to provide naturalization application assistance to 63 Legal Permanent Residents. “Americans by choice” who attended represented 33 distinct countries including Poland, Haiti, China, Ghana, the Philippines, Guatemala, Cuba, Mexico, Russia, Egypt, Bermuda, Ecuador, Belgium and Korea.

As committed volunteers, you welcomed participants to Rutgers and helped them navigate the path to US citizenship. For many, it was their first visit to Rutgers and a day many of them will never forget. Thank you!

A few requests:

  • Tell your friends and family about the project. We’re always on the lookout for new partners, volunteers and funders. These could be individuals, companies or organizations. Send your ideas to CR@eagleton.rutgers.edu.
  • Please take a few minutes to tell us about your Citizenship Rutgers experience. Your feedback will help us know what’s working well and what might be improved.
  • Come back! We look forward to working with you again. Citizenship Rutgers will hold assistance drives on Saturday, November 10 in Newark and Sunday, December 9 in New Brunswick.
  • Find fresh photos and leave comments about the day on CR’s Facebook page.

Once again, thank you for giving generously of your time, your talent and your passion!

With gratitude,

Randi M. Chielewski
Janice Fine
Joanne Gottesman
Andrea Huerta
Eve Klothen
Liz Zahler

Citizenship Rutgers: Jersey Roots, Global Reach

April 23, 2012 - no comments. Posted by in Citizenship Rutgers.

Spanish:

Chinese:

Korean:

Saakshi Arora Interview

April 23, 2012 - no comments. Posted by in Citizenship Rutgers.

Saakshi Arora, a junior at Rutgers University, recently attended a naturalization ceremony hosted by Citizenship Rutgers at the Eagleton Institute of Politics. There, she and her mother became fully naturalized citizens of the United States. Vanessa Matthews, a volunteer with Eagleton’s Program on Immigration and Democracy, interviewed Ms. Arora for a feature article in Citizenship Rutgers’ newsletter and web page at http://epid.rutgers.edu/gallery/citizenship-rutgers/.

Saakshi, a Rutgers student, her mother, a research scientist, and other new Americans raised their rights hands as they were sworn in as US Citizens at Rutgers University, in November 2011.

Vanessa: What is your native country and how long have you been living in the United States?
Saakshi: I am 20 years old and was born in India. I have been living in the United States for 11 years. When I was 9 years old, my mother got a work (H1B) visa with a pharmaceutical company in the United States, which is when we moved.

Vanessa: What was the process like for you to become a naturalized citizen?
Saakshi: I actually thought it was really nice. When I went to take the (citizenship) test in Newark, I was really nervous but they said I passed! About five minutes later someone invited me to the Citizenship Rutgers ceremony. I was excited to accept because being part of Rutgers and Douglass (College) has been an amazing experience so being naturalized on campus was a great idea.

Vanessa: Can you describe your experience as a LPR at RU? Did you face any obstacles?
Saakshi: I came to the U.S. on an H1B visa through my mom’s job, so I didn’t really face any big challenges at Rutgers. After a couple of years, we applied for a Green Card through her company and 5 years after that we applied for citizenship. It took a while but we finally got it and Rutgers’ program to help review the application and documents was great. We were really concerned on whether or not we were doing it the right way, so it was great to have all our questions answered.

Vanessa: How, if at all, has naturalization changed your perspective on higher education or living in the United States in general?
Saakshi: You know, I was asked the same question when I completed the exam in Newark after they found out I was a Rutgers student. At that moment, I didn’t feel anything different; I thought of it as just changing from being an Indian citizen to being an American citizen. But then I realized this is a big deal. I am now really excited to vote, which I couldn’t do when I turned 18, and this is a huge year to do it. Being a citizen of the U.S. also gives me an extra benefit of qualifying for education grants, which I didn’t have access to before, so that’s great.

Vanessa: What insight or advice would you offer to other students, LPRs or undocumented students, in pursuing a path to citizenship?
Saakshi: I would definitely tell them to take the time to research everything. It is difficult to be comfortable with changing your citizenship and people will go through those mixed feelings. But I think it is great once you do because you have so many more options and are able to develop a career path to give your kids better opportunities, like my mom did. I didn’t have that many attachments back in India since I was only 9, so it was less difficult for me, but once people accept that change, then I think the benefits are awesome.

Vanessa: What, if any, other resources did you use to learn about or facilitate your naturalization?
Saakshi: We mainly used the general USCIS website and the Citizenship Rutgers tools.

Vanessa: Since you attended the naturalization ceremony at RU, how did it feel to get your citizenship on the same campus where you are also earning your degree?
Saakshi: I cannot tell you how excited I was. It wasn’t like a normal day. I told my mother, “Mom, I am going to my own campus to become a citizen.” It was such a big deal in my life. My mom changed her life to bring me to the United States for a better opportunity and I couldn’t think of a better person to get naturalized with.

Saakshi and her mom pose with an employee of the Department of Homeland Security after taking the Oath of Allegiance.


Vanessa: Since you and your mother were naturalized at the same time, could you describe how you felt about that mother-daughter experience (or with other relatives)?
Saakshi: I have a younger sister who is 8 and was born here, so I don’t have any other siblings who were going to get naturalized, so it was just my mom and me. However, my sister was extremely excited for us. She saw how special the experience was and was even upset that she couldn’t do it, too. My mom has been my rock; she’s been with me the whole time, so it was amazing to do it with her. Meanwhile, now my sister is excited I can go and vote for her school’s budget so her class can win an ice cream social (laughs).

Vanessa: What are your professional or future goals as an “official” American?
Saakshi: (laughs) Right now I am studying Psychology and Neuroscience and I want to pursue medical school in the future.

Vanessa: Is there anything else you would like to share with Citizenship Rutgers or the immigrant community about your experience?
Saakshi: I would just say this is an amazing process to go through, but everyone needs to be willing to get the help. It is an extensive and expensive process, I don’t know how people with who struggle with money would pay for it, but I’d research for any assistance. I think that the main reason why people hesitate to apply is because it’s tedious, redundant and difficult to understand, so definitely do not be afraid to ask for help.

Vanessa: Thank you so much for your time, Saakshi! It’s been great chatting with you!

CITIZENSHIP RUTGERS featured on RU-TV’s WAKE UP RUTGERS

April 19, 2012 - no comments. Posted by in Citizenship Rutgers, News.

Anastasia Mann, director of the EPID, spoke at an interview about Citizenship Rutgers on April 19, 2012 on RU TV’s Wake Up Rutgers program.

Interview happens 12:45 minutes in.

Note: If the video does not work, please go to http://rutv.rutgers.edu/programming-channels/wake-rutgers and find the April 19, 2012 video.

Rutgers Launches Tri-Campus ‘Citizenship Rutgers’

October 11, 2011 - no comments. Posted by in Citizenship Rutgers.

Immigrant Family

A very happy immigrant family from CR New Brunswick!

The best of Rutgers was on display with the launch of Citizenship Rutgers, a university-based citizenship application assistance project, in New Brunswick on April 9, 2011.

This tri-campus collaboration brought representatives of New Jersey’s approximately 400,000 Legal Permanent Residents to the Student Center in New Brunswick. Each participant sat down with an immigration lawyer to examine their documents and a student, faculty or staff member who had been trained on the N200 form.

Students, faculty, staff and alumni from 24 countries around the world and around New Jersey, rolled up their sleeves to do the work of integration, together with friends, colleagues, classmates and neighbors.

Thanks to 50+ Rutgers volunteers and our friends from the City University of New York’s CITIZENSHIP NOW!, nearly 100 people had a free consultation with an immigration lawyer. Of these just over 50 people met the eligibility standard to complete the application. All of this was accomplished in just a three hour window. 

Those who received professional legal assistance free of charge from immigration lawyers volunteering their time included Rutgers students (grad and undergrad), staff (from development to food services), and faculty (at least one department chair, and numerous others), along with their friends, family and neighbors.

New Jersey’s storied diversity was on display among those who participated. They came from 24 different nations: the United Kingdom, India, the Philippines, Nigeria, Honduras, Slovakia, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Mexico, Sierra Leone, Jamaica, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, El Salvador, Portugal, Argentina, Republic of Georgia, Ghana, Peru, Hong Kong, and the Dominican Republic.

Student volunteers contributed their cultural knowledge, language capacity, technical know-how and civic enthusiasm.

Citizenship NOW staff (Director, Allan Wernick; Deputy Director, James McGovern; and Special Projects Coordinator, Kymete Gashi), provided critical technical assistance based on the 14-year history of running that project across the five boroughs of New York City.

Bonner leader Giuseppe Cespedes led the energetic and skilled cadre of undergraduate volunteers methodically through the painstaking process of application assistance.

Giuseppe Cespedes and Dr. Anastasia Mann

Giuseppe Cespedes and Dr. Anastasia Mann

A cooperative venture on an unprecedented scale, Citizenship Rutgers mustered faculty, students and alumni from Rutgers law schools at Camden and Newark. They provided much of the required guidance and expertise.

Like the best collaborations, Citizenship Rutgers marries esprit de corps with efficiency and excellence. All were readily on display at this kickoff event.

Onward! A delante!

Stay tuned: Next stops for Citizenship Rutgers are drives at Camden (10/1) and Newark (10/29)!

For information about joining the Citizenship Rutgers volunteer corps, supporting the effort financially, or receiving assistance, write to Dr. Anastasia Mann amann@rutgers.edu

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